Brain Imaging Will Treat Depression Patients Accurately, AI Suggests Machine

The increasing trend of Artificial Intelligence (AI) can bring great changes in the field of health. In a study conducted on depression patients, scientists have claimed that with its help, it is now possible to decide which medicine can help the patient recover quickly. Indeed, with the help of AI, scientists have identified patterns of brain activity that determine how effective antidepressants can be for people.  In a study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry and the Nature Human Behavior Journal, scientists have reported that imaging of the patient’s brain can now determine whether the drugs will be effective in treating the disease. The study includes findings from a large nationally conducted test (EMBARC). The aim is to strategize for the treatment of neurological disorders based on biology and to improve traditional methods of treatment.

Researchers from the UT Southwesterns Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care in the United States were also involved in this study. Researchers reported that in view of the increasing number of patients with neurological disorders, they developed a new way of removing the barriers to treatment. This involves imaging the brain and analyzing blood. EMBARC manager Madhukar Trivedi said, “We have to end guessing games now and need to take measures that can cure the disease quickly and accurately.” He said that patients with depression were already depressed. Huh. If they take medicines that are ineffective, then this worsens their problem. For this study, researchers examined brain activity using brain imaging techniques of more than 300 participants.

Liliana Donato is assignment Journalist at Daily Research Chronicle. Liliana has covered Business, Politics and many other beats in her Journalism career and is currently living in Seattle for more than 15 years. Liliana has appeared periodically on national television shows and also has published her articles many regional publications such as The Stranger and Seattle Met etc.

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